Beyond toleration : the religious origins of American pluralism / Chris Beneke. [print]

By: Beneke, Chris [author]Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, New York : Oxford University Press, [(c)2006Description: ix, 305 pages ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0195305558; 0195382668; 9780195305555; 9780195382662Subject(s): Freedom of religion -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Religious pluralism -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Religious HistoryLOC classification: BR516.B464.B496 2006COPYRIGHT: Use of this publication is limited to a maximum of the greater of (a) 20% of any single Work and (b) two chapters or articles, in any single course. https://ciu.libwizard.com/f/copyright-requests
Contents:
The plague of dissent: and the rise of toleration Partial judgments and divided churches: America's first great awakening Open to all parties: the ordeal of religious integration "None are tolerated": the rise of religious liberty "Equality or nothing!": religious pluralism in the founding of the republic "[M]ingle with us as Americans": religious pluralism after the founding.
Summary: At its founding, the United States was one of the most religiously diverse places in the world. Baptists, Methodists, Catholics, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Quakers, Dutch Reformed, German Reformed, Lutherans, Huguenots, Dunkers, Jews, Moravians, and Mennonites populated the nations towns and villages. Dozens of new denominations would emerge over the succeeding years. What allowed people of so many different faiths to forge a nation together? In this richly told story of ideas, Chris Beneke demonstrates how the United States managed to overcome the religious violence and bigotry that characterized much of early modern Europe and America. The key, Beneke argues, did not lie solely in the protection of religious freedom. Instead, he reveals how American culture was transformed to accommodate the religious differences within it. The expansion of individual rights, the mixing of believers and churches in the same institutions, and the introduction of more civility into public life all played an instrumental role in creating the religious pluralism for which the United States has become renowned. These changes also established important precedents for future civil rights movements in which dignity, as much as equality, would be at stake. Beyond Toleration is the first book to offer a systematic explanation of how early Americans learned to live with differences in matters of the highest importance to them https://www.amazon.com/Beyond-Toleration-Religious-American-Pluralism/dp/0195305558/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=9780195305555&qid=1594904698&sr=8-1
Tags from this library: Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Reference (Library Use ONLY) Reference (Library Use ONLY) G Allen Fleece Library
Reference (1st floor - front of library)
Research BR516 .B39 2006 (Browse shelf) Not for loan CHP6100 31923001742770

The plague of dissent: and the rise of toleration Partial judgments and divided churches: America's first great awakening Open to all parties: the ordeal of religious integration "None are tolerated": the rise of religious liberty "Equality or nothing!": religious pluralism in the founding of the republic "[M]ingle with us as Americans": religious pluralism after the founding.

At its founding, the United States was one of the most religiously diverse places in the world. Baptists, Methodists, Catholics, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Quakers, Dutch Reformed, German Reformed, Lutherans, Huguenots, Dunkers, Jews, Moravians, and Mennonites populated the nations towns and villages. Dozens of new denominations would emerge over the succeeding years. What allowed people of so many different faiths to forge a nation together? In this richly told story of ideas, Chris Beneke demonstrates how the United States managed to overcome the religious violence and bigotry that characterized much of early modern Europe and America. The key, Beneke argues, did not lie solely in the protection of religious freedom. Instead, he reveals how American culture was transformed to accommodate the religious differences within it. The expansion of individual rights, the mixing of believers and churches in the same institutions, and the introduction of more civility into public life all played an instrumental role in creating the religious pluralism for which the United States has become renowned. These changes also established important precedents for future civil rights movements in which dignity, as much as equality, would be at stake. Beyond Toleration is the first book to offer a systematic explanation of how early Americans learned to live with differences in matters of the highest importance to them

https://www.amazon.com/Beyond-Toleration-Religious-American-Pluralism/dp/0195305558/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=9780195305555&qid=1594904698&sr=8-1

COPYRIGHT: Use of this publication is limited to a maximum of the greater of (a) 20% of any single Work and (b) two chapters or articles, in any single course.

https://ciu.libwizard.com/f/copyright-requests

Chris Beneke is Assistant Professor of History at Bentley College in Waltham, Massachusetts He received his Bachelors degree from Cornell University and his PhD from Northwestern University.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
Columbia International University admits students of any race, color, national, and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic, and other school-administered programs.