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A prophet like Moses? : a narrative-theological reading of the Elijah stories / Havilah Dharamraj ; foreword by R.W.L. Moberly.

By: Dharamraj, Havilah [author]Material type: TextTextSeries: Paternoster biblical monographs: Publisher: Milton Keynes, England ; Colorado Springs, Colorado : Paternoster, (c)2011Description: xvii, 262 pages ; 23 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781842275337; 184227533XSubject(s): Elijah (Biblical prophet) | Bible. Kings -- Criticism, Narrative | Bible. Kings -- Criticism, interpretation, etcLOC classification: BS580.E4.D533.P767 2011
Contents:
1. Introduction: What may be expected of a prophet like Moses? 2. 1 Kings 16:29-17:24: the drought 3. 1 Kings 18: The resolution of the drought 4. 1 Kings 19: Horeb 5. 1 Kings 22:51-2 Kings 1:18: Elijah and Ahaziah 6. 2 Kings 2: Elijah's ascension and Elisha's succession 7. Is Elijah a prophet like Moses?
Summary: "Since rabbinic times, the resonance between the Moses stories and the Elijah stories has been regularly noted. Taking into account that Deuteronomy 18:18 promises Israel a 'prophet like Moses', this resonance compels an evaluation of Elijah, holding Moses as the benchmark. Here, scholarship struggles with a paradox. At Horeb Elijah fails in the critical prophetic task of intercession. Yet, his service as prophet is affirmed beyond doubt in his iconic whirlwind-and-chariots-of-fire exit. How are these to be reconciled? Is Elijah a prophet of Mosaic fibre or not? This work offers a strikingly different approach to the Elijah stories. Dharamraj employs the narrative critical method to offer a close reading of the text - a reading that is singular in its sensitivity to the inner-biblical exegesis mediated by the Moses parallels. Such an approach opens up intriguing possibilities in interpretation. Here, her analysis of the dramatic and difficult discourse of the earthquake-wind-fire- 'still, small voice' theophany at Horeb is notable. So also, is the case she carefully builds for whether Elijah emerges as the hoped-for 'prophet like Moses'."--Back cover.
List(s) this item appears in: 2020-2021: Print Resource Purchases | AMAZON2020-2021
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Non-fiction BS580.D533.P767 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 31923002036917

Includes bibliographical references (pages 229-247) and indexes.

1. Introduction: What may be expected of a prophet like Moses? 2. 1 Kings 16:29-17:24: the drought 3. 1 Kings 18: The resolution of the drought 4. 1 Kings 19: Horeb 5. 1 Kings 22:51-2 Kings 1:18: Elijah and Ahaziah 6. 2 Kings 2: Elijah's ascension and Elisha's succession 7. Is Elijah a prophet like Moses?

"Since rabbinic times, the resonance between the Moses stories and the Elijah stories has been regularly noted. Taking into account that Deuteronomy 18:18 promises Israel a 'prophet like Moses', this resonance compels an evaluation of Elijah, holding Moses as the benchmark. Here, scholarship struggles with a paradox. At Horeb Elijah fails in the critical prophetic task of intercession. Yet, his service as prophet is affirmed beyond doubt in his iconic whirlwind-and-chariots-of-fire exit. How are these to be reconciled? Is Elijah a prophet of Mosaic fibre or not? This work offers a strikingly different approach to the Elijah stories. Dharamraj employs the narrative critical method to offer a close reading of the text - a reading that is singular in its sensitivity to the inner-biblical exegesis mediated by the Moses parallels. Such an approach opens up intriguing possibilities in interpretation. Here, her analysis of the dramatic and difficult discourse of the earthquake-wind-fire- 'still, small voice' theophany at Horeb is notable. So also, is the case she carefully builds for whether Elijah emerges as the hoped-for 'prophet like Moses'."--Back cover.

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